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Can You Last Long With a Pet Frog?

Unless you’re a serious exotic pet collector or a passionate pet lover, a pet frog may not be good for you. There aren’t many pet frog owners out there (albeit it might be your reason of getting a frog), so there’s not many people to ask for advice or help about your pet. Plus, for sure there’s not many of your friends thrilled about frogs, so expect less show-and-tell moments about your pet.

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And be warned that frogs can live from 4 to 15 years. Throwing them on the creek or river is a brutal way of getting out of the responsibility; all exotic frogs dispose of this way will surely die. Might as well put them on a pot with cold water and slowly boil them to death – of course expect the ASPCA at your door if you do this.

So before you take on the responsibility, be sure that you’re really serious about a pet frog.

Common Pet Frog Species

Don’t be deceived about Pixie frogs… they’re by no means tiny! You’ll be shocked to know its common name is really “The African Bullfrog,” which can grow up to 8 inches long. So, before dishing out money for a frog, get to know the most common pet frog species first.

For a newbie pet frog owner, African Dwarf Frogs are the most favorite. They are active, easy to care for, completely aquatic frogs which you can put together with your fish. The other popular species include the following:

– Oriental Fire Bellied Toads
– White’s Tree Frog
– African Clawed Frogs
– American Green Tree Frogs
– Pacman Frogs

Pet Frog Characteristics

1. Sedentary – Most big pet frogs are pretty sedentary. They make a pretty boring pet if you may: no interaction, no affection, and no playing. But there’s going to be a lot of chasing if they jump out of their tank.

2. Jumping – A pet frog, big or small, is an excellent jumper – some species are slimy. So make sure you’re holding it tight without choking it blue or breaking its bones if you don’t want it to slip through your grip. Because when they do, expect a whole lot of chasing and screaming girls in the house.

3. Hibernating – Some pet frog species such as the Pacman does hibernate. Hibernating pet frogs need certain type of care before, during, and after hibernation, which can be a handful if you’re a busy person.

Housing a Pet Frog

Housing pet frogs is not some easy feat; after successfully designing one, you’ll feel that sense of achievement. Generally, a pet frog tank design should conform to the type of frog you have: terrestrial, aquatic, semi-aquatic, and arboreal frogs.

Of all these types of frogs, the terrestrial type is the easiest to design a tank for. You simply need some sand or pebble for substrate, log or rock, a plant, and a water dish.

Aquatic frogs live all its life in water, so you can place them with your pet fish (count them as one fish in the tank for size).

The semi aquatic pet frog tank needs some thought to build. You need some pebble to fill half of the tank to serve as the dry area, and the other half should contain deep enough water.

For arboreal frogs, the tank has to be high to contain tall tree trunks because they love to spend most of their time high up in trees. Of course your tank has to have lid all the time for types of frogs.

Feeding a Pet Frog

In the wild, tiny frogs eat insects, and big frogs such as the African Bull Frog can eat even pinkie mice. In captivity, your pet frog likes to eat live cricket, mealworm, earthworm, or the pinkie mice for the bigger frog. So raising a pet frog means raising these live critters used to feed your frogs as well.

Those are what are involved in raising a pet frog. Aside from the necessary license to care for an exotic pet, you need the time and the passion of raising these colorful, leather-skinned pet of a frog.

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