Considerations before Adopting a Cat

Just because you’re smitten by a kitten doesn’t mean you’re ready to adopt a cat. Although having a domesticated and affectionate cat in the house is no less than therapeutic, it’s also a responsibility. Simply disposing a cat in the alley if the responsibility proves to be overwhelming is an unnecessary torture to the animal and to you – not to mention a traumatic experience to your children if you have. You should be in it for the entire life of your mouser.

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Before you shop around for the cutest cat you can bring home, consider these cat adoption questions and check whether you can answer “yes” to all them.

Do YOU Want a Cat?

If your answer to this question is something like “my child wants one,” then reconsider the cat adoption again. The desire to adopt a cat should come from you – without yielding to your child’s constant plea for a fury pet. This way you’ll enjoy every trip to the vet, the extra time browsing the cat food section, the regular litter box cleaning, and even the extra items on your budget.

Can You Afford a Cat?

Although some shelters spay or neuter the cat before giving them away for cat adoption, having a cat is still expensive. Cat foods are not exactly cheap and neither are cat litter pellets; there are regular vaccinations that your cat should get, and they can be costly; there is also the microchipping/ID tagging, grooming, toys, and the expensive vet fee should your cat gets sick. So make sure you can afford a cat.

Do You Have Time for the Cat?

Before cat adoption, the shelter will ask you if you have a time for the cat. Rightfully so because having a cat at home is time demanding. Cats can’t empty the litter box by themselves, they can’t drive to the vet for a checkup, they can’t give themselves a bath, they can’t open the cat food can by their claws, and they need companionship from time to time. Especially if you’re out for travel often, you can’t leave the cat alone at home.

Is Your Home Ready For a Cat?

If you’re renting or living in an apartment, check the rental agreement if you’re allowed to bring home a fury friend. Remember also that a cat can be a handful; it can make your expensive furniture its scratching pole and your China an imaginary chicken. You can hurt them with cleaning materials or poisonous houseplants that are within reach too. So make sure your home is ready for cat adoption.

Is Your Cat Safe From Your Other Pets, Vice Versa?

If you have other pets, either your cat is in danger or your other pets are. Make sure that your dog is friendly with cats or Tweety’s perch is high enough for Sylvester to reach. Mixing a cat with other four-legged or feathered member of the family may not be a good idea if your house is not built like a zoo, so consider this before cat adoption too.

If you can answer “yes” to all of these questions without a hint of doubt in your mind, then you’re ready for cat adoption. And if you’re not after of any particular cat breed, cat adoption from shelters is a noble thing you can do for less privileged cats – giving them a new chance for a home and family is a nice idea. So take some time to visit animal shelters and see if there’s a cat for adoption waiting for you. And if you really want specific cat breed, buy only from reputable breeders who are not engaged in exploitative cat breeding or other means to breed their cats.

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