White’s Tree Frog Care Sheet

The leathery green skin of a White’s tree frog perhaps epitomizes what a pet frog is for most people. In case you haven’t heard about White’s tree frog, maybe you’ve heard about green tree frog, Australian green tree frog, or dumpy tree frog. They are the same thing. They came from down under and spread through pet frog supplies almost across the world through pet trade.

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Why Have a White’s Tree Frog as Pet

So, why a White’s tree frog…? To begin, White’s tree frog is among the few pet frogs suitable for a newbie pet frog owner. They’re easy to care for – not needing special type of attention like fire bellied toads for example. Green tree frogs can live up to 16 years, so they’re also suitable for people looking for long-term pets. They don’t mind being handled and would love to climb from your palm up to your shoulder using its fingertips suction caps. However, on their tank, green tree frogs spend most of their time idle.

Description of White’s Tree Frog

White’s tree frogs can grow up to 4 inches in length. Its coloration varies with environment ranging from brown to green. It’s got small irregularly shaped white spots on the back that increase in number with age. Another distinguishing characteristic of Australian green tree frogs are their fingertips suction that helps the frogs climb on glass. And in captivity, Australian green tree frogs tend to become obese, thus the name dumpy tree frogs.

Housing White’s Tree Frog

A White’s tree frog terrarium can be a 10 gallon tank you can buy from online pet supplies store. It’s recommended to use ingestible substrate from pet frog supplies store that won’t result to impaction when accidentally swallowed. Keep the terrarium at a cozy 70-85 degrees Fahrenheit. And put some tree log, fake plants, or some tree branches for climbing – just don’t forget to keep the lid always close to avoid jail break.

Feeding White’s Tree Frog

Smaller White’s tree frogs are fed with crickets, mealworms, beetles, and other smaller insects. The bigger ones can be fed with pinkie mice once in a while. A word of caution though, Australian green tree frogs can easily get obese in captivity. If you start seeing your pet’s skin folding over its eyes, it’s time to cut back the food ration. Keep clean water always available, but make sure to get only a shallow water dish from pet frog supplies store because Australian green tree frogs are not good swimmers.

Handling White’s Tree Frog

White’s tree frogs don’t mind being held. But before you pick your pet up wash your hands with running clear water. Don’t lather up because some soap residue can harm your pet frog’s skin. Running water is enough to wash off your sweat, oil secretions, and other contaminants on your hands. Lather up with some disinfectant after handling your pet frog to remove its secretions and bacteria from your skin.

White’s Tree Frog Trivia

Now that you know how to care for your White’s tree frog, it’s time to learn some trivia about your pet to impress your friends. Did you know that the Australian “green” tree frog are originally called “blue” frog despite its color? White’s tree frogs have blue and green skin pigments protected by yellow outer covering. The original specimen of Australian green tree frogs sent to England from Australia were accidentally stripped of its yellow outer covering, thus leaving only the visible blue pigment of the frogs. Thus the specimen displays of the species in London were blue. So they were originally called blue tree frogs.

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